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Birds Migrating
Photo courtesy of U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
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Since this exhibition was inspired by the phenomenon of bird migration, here is some information for you about why and how birds migrate.

Birds migrate in spring to find areas with longer daylight, which produce the insects and fruits birds need to breed their young. They migrate in fall when the days become shorter, and food and open water become scarce.

To find their way, migrating birds use a variety of cues for navigating. Birds that travel by day, including hawks and vultures, swallows, swifts, and nighthawks use the angle of the setting sun, land features such as mountains and rivers, and wind direction. Birds that travel by night or over vast ocean distances, such as warblers, swallows, and thrushes, use a combination of star patterns, the earth's magnetic field, and odors. Some birds can detect ultraviolet radiations and very deep sound vibrations such as distant ocean waves.

Birds Migrating
Photo courtesy of U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
Show a larger view of this picture
Birds Migrating
Photo courtesy of U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
Show a larger view of this picture
Birds Migrating
Photo courtesy of U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
Show a larger view of this picture