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The exhibition addresses curriculum standards for the VISUAL ARTS:

A. Visual Memory and Knowledge: Students in Wisconsin will know and remember information and ideas about the art and design around them and throughout the world.

  • A.4.1 Develop a basic mental storehouse of images
  • A.4.2 Learn basic vocabulary related to their study of art
  • A.4.3 Learn about basic styles of art from their own and other parts of the world
  • A.4.6 Know that art is a basic way of thinking and communicating about the world
  • A.8.1 Develop a mental storehouse of images
  • A.8.2 Learn appropriate vocabulary related to their study of art
  • A.8.3 Know about styles of art from their own and other parts of the world
  • A.8.6 Identify ways in which art is basic to thinking and communicating about the world
  • A.12.1 Possess a mental storehouse of images
  • A.12.2 Know advanced vocabulary related to their study of art
  • A.12.3 Know and recognize styles of art from their own and other parts of the world
  • A.12.6 Use art as a basic way of thinking and communicating about the world

B: Art, Design History, Citizenship, and Environment: Students will understand the value and significance of the visual arts, media and design in relation to history, citizenship, the environment, and social development.

  • B.4.3 Know that works of art and designed objects relate to specific cultures, times, and places
  • B.4.4 Know that art is influenced by artists, designers, and cultures
  • B.4.5 Understand that their choices in art are shaped by their own culture and society
  • B.8.3 Identify works of art and designed objects as they relate to specific cultures, times, and places
  • B.8.4 Know ways in which art is influenced by artists, designers, and cultures
  • B.8.5 Understand how their choices in art are shaped by their own culture and society
  • B.12.3 Relate works of art and designed objects to specific cultures, times, and places
  • B.12.4 Know how artists, designers, and cultures influence art
  • B.12.5 Understand how their choices in art are shaped by their own culture and society

D. Practical Applications: Students will apply their knowledge of people, places, ideas, and language of art and design to their daily lives.

  • D.4.1 Know basic information, such as the history, public art, and unique architecture, of their own cultural community
  • D.4.2 Know about artists and designers, such as architects, furniture designers, critics, preservationists, museum curators, and gallery owners, in their community
  • D.4.3 Know that the environment influences the look and use of art, architecture, and design
  • D.4.4 Learn about basic concepts in art, such as "form follows function," "less is more," balance, symmetry, and originality
  • D.4.5 Learn basic language used in art
  • D.4.6 Use problem-solving strategies that promote fluency, flexibility, elaboration, and originality
  • D.8.1 Know about the history, public art, and unique architecture of their cultural community
  • D.8.2 Know about artists and designers, such as architects, furniture designers, critics, preservationists, museum curators, and gallery owners, in their community
  • D.8.3 Know how the environment influences the look and use of art, architecture, and design
  • D.8.4 Understand basic concepts in art, such as "form follows function," "destruction of the box," "less is more," balance, symmetry, integrity, authenticity, and originality
  • D.8.5 Learn common language in art, such as abstraction, representation, impressionism, reproduction, serigraphy, sculpture, graphic design, construction, and aesthetics
  • D.8.6 Know about problem-solving strategies that promote fluency, flexibility, elaboration, and originality
  • D.12.1 Know about the history, public art, and unique architecture of their cultural community
  • D.12.2 Know about artists and designers, such as architects, furniture designers, critics, preservationists, museum curators, and gallery owners, in their community
  • D.12.3 Explain how the environment influences the look and use of art, architecture, and design
  • D.12.4 Use basic concepts in art, such as "form follows function," "destruction of the box," "less is more," balance, symmetry, integrity, authenticity, and originality
  • D.12.5 Know common language in art, such as abstraction, representation, impressionism, reproduction, serigraphy, sculpture, graphic design, construction, and aesthetics
  • D.12.6 Apply problem-solving strategies that promote fluency, flexibility, elaboration, and originality

G. Art and Design Criticism: Students will interpret visual experiences, such as artwork, designed objects, architecture, movies, television, and multimedia images, using a range of subject matter, symbols, and ideas.

  • G.4.1 Know that art communicates ideas
  • G.4.2 Know that artwork has meanings
  • G.4.3 Talk and write about the meanings of artworks and design
  • G.8.1 Know that visual images are important tools for thinking and communicating
  • G.8.2 Know how to find the meanings in artwork
  • G.8.3 Analyze the meanings of artworks and design
  • G.12.1 Use visual images as tools for thinking and communicating
  • G.12.2 Know how to find the meanings in artwork
  • G.12.3 Interpret more complex meanings in challenging works of art, including media arts

H. Visual Thinking: Students will develop perception, visual discrimination, and media literacy skills to become visually educated people.

  • H.4.5 Be able to read simple maps, charts, and plans
  • H.8.1 Look at things using different methods and tools, such as through a microscope

I. Personal and Social Development: Students will use their senses and emotions through art and design to develop their minds and to improve social relationships.

  • I.4.1 Use art to understand how they feel
  • I.4.3 Talk or write about feelings in a work of art
  • I.4.4 Recognize their own feelings when they look at work of art
  • I.4.5 Understand that art is made by people from different times, places, and cultures
  • I.4.6 Realize that creating or looking at art can bring out different feelings
  • I.8.1 Use art to understand their own emotions
  • I.8.3 Talk or write about feelings in a variety of works of art
  • I.8.4 Recognize that their own feelings affect how they look at art
  • I.8.5 Understand that art reflects the time and place in which it was created
  • I.8.6 Understand how creating or looking at art brings out feelings
  • I.12.1 Use art to understand their own and others' emotions
  • I.12.3 Compare and contrast feelings in a work of art
  • I.12.4 Look at art and compare their feelings with those of the artist and others
  • I.12.5 Understand and recognize that art reflects the history and culture in which it was created

The exhibition addresses curriculum standards for SCIENCE:

A. Science Connections: Students will understand that there are unifying themes: systems, order, organization, and interactions; evidence, models, and explanations; constancy, change, and measurement; evolution, equilibrium, and energy; form and function among scientific disciplines

  • A.4.1 When conducting science investigations, ask and answer questions that will help decide the general areas of science being addressed
  • A.4.5 When studying a science-related problem, decide what changes over time are occurring or have occurred
  • A.8.4 Collect evidence to show that models developed as explanations for events were (and are) based on the evidence available to scientists at the time

E. Earth and Space Science: Students will demonstrate understanding of the structure and systems of earth and other bodies in the universe and of their interactions

  • E.4.4 Identify celestial objects (stars, sun, moon, planets) in the sky, noting changes in patterns of those objects over time
  • E.4.6 Using the science themes, find patterns and cycles in the earth's daily, yearly, and long-term changes
  • E.8.7 Describe the general structure of the solar system, galaxies, and the universe, explaining the nature of the evidence used to develop current models of the universe
  • E.8.8 Using past and current models of the structure of the solar system, explain the daily, monthly, yearly, and long-term cycles of the earth, citing evidence gained from personal observation as well as evidence used by scientists

F. Life and environmental science: Students will demonstrate an understanding of the characteristics and structures of living things, the processes of life, and how living things interact with one another and their environment.

  • F.4.2 Investigate how organisms, especially plants, respond to both internal cues (the need for water) and external cues (changes in the environment)
  • F.8.2 Show how organisms have adapted structures to match their functions, providing means of encouraging individual and group survival within specific environments
  • F.8.7 Understand that an organism's behavior evolves through adaptation to its environment
  • F.8.9 Explain how some of the changes on the earth are contributing to changes in the balance of life and affecting the survival or population growth of certain species
  • F.8.10 Project how current trends in human resource use and population growth will influence the natural environment, and show how current policies affect those trends
  • F.12.12 Trace how the sensory and nervous systems of various organisms react to the internal and external environment and transmit survival or learning stimuli to cause changes in behavior or responses

The exhibition addresses curriculum standards for SOCIAL STUDIES:

Geography: People, Places, and Environments. Students will learn about geography through the study of the relationships among people, places, and environments.

  • A.4.1 Use reference points, latitude and longitude, direction, size, shape, and scale to locate positions on various representations of the earth's surface
  • A.4.2 Locate on a map or globe physical features such as continents, oceans, mountain ranges, and land forms, natural features such as resources, flora, and fauna; and human features such as cities, states, and national borders
  • A.4.7 Identify connections between the local community and other places in Wisconsin, the United States, and the world
  • A.8.1 Use a variety of geographic representations, such as political, physical, and topographic maps, a globe, aerial photographs, and satellite images, to gather and compare information about a place
  • A.8.11 Give examples of the causes and consequences of current global issues, such as the expansion of global markets, the urbanization of the developing world, the consumption of natural resources, and the extinction of species, and suggest possible responses by various individuals, groups, and nations
  • A.12.6 Collect and analyze geographic information to examine the effects that a geographic or environmental change in one part of the world, such as volcanic activity, river diversion, ozone depletion, air pollution, deforestation, or desertification, may have on other parts of the world
  • A.12.12 Assess the advantages and disadvantages of selected land use policies in the local community, Wisconsin, the United States, and the world

Time, Continuity & Change: Students will learn about the history of Wisconsin, the United States, and the world, examining change and continuity over time in order to develop historical perspective, explain historical relationships, and analyze issues that affect the present and the future.

  • B.4.1 Identify and examine various sources of information that are used for constructing an understanding of the past, such as artifacts, documents, letters, diaries, maps, textbooks, photos, paintings, architecture, oral presentations, graphs, and charts
  • B.8.1 Interpret the past using a variety of sources, such as biographies, diaries, journals, artifacts, eyewitness interviews, and other primary source materials, and evaluate the credibility of sources used
  • B.12.9 Select significant changes caused by technology, industrialization, urbanization, and population growth, and analyze the effects of these changes in the United States and the world